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Looking to upgrade your PC for Alpha 2?

VyrilVyril Member
edited January 16 in General Discussion
Just a little PSA.

2024 is the year of potential big leaps for CPUs in the gaming world.

AMD and Intel are both launching new chips in 2024 that have potential significant increase, in performance and energy efficiency.

CPU
  • AMD with their 8000 series
  • Intel with their 15th Gens.

GPU
  • AMD to launch 7000 series GPUs in early 2024
  • Nvidia to launch 5000 Series in late 2024 or early 2025

So if you're looking to upgrade, I would recommend looking into waiting till the release of these components, or to get a discount on existing components when the new ones release.

Comments

  • I have set aside a budget of 2k when Ashes comes out. Wish I knew how to build my own though
    m6jque7ofxxf.gif
  • VyrilVyril Member
    I have set aside a budget of 2k when Ashes comes out. Wish I knew how to build my own though

    TBH - A few Youtube videos will get you there. Patience and a willingness to learn and you should be good to go.
  • Thanks for the update, this is very relevant.
  • Vyril wrote: »
    Just a little PSA.

    2024 is the year of potential big leaps for CPUs in the gaming world.

    AMD and Intel are both launching new chips in 2024 that have potential significant increase, in performance and energy efficiency.

    CPU
    • AMD with their 8000 series
    • Intel with their 15th Gens.

    GPU
    • AMD to launch 7000 series GPUs in early 2024
    • Nvidia to launch 5000 Series in late 2024 or early 2025

    So if you're looking to upgrade, I would recommend looking into waiting till the release of these components, or to get a discount on existing components when the new ones release.

    oh yeah! I've been gaming on my laptop but I built a desktop a while back but couldn't get a GPU. I'm buying an RX 7600 XT for that desktop. that GPU is coming out at the end of this month, I think, but I always like to wait 2-3 months to buy tech stuff after they come out. I play on 1080 so I probs don't need more than that :3
  • VyrilVyril Member
    Depraved wrote: »
    Vyril wrote: »
    Just a little PSA.

    2024 is the year of potential big leaps for CPUs in the gaming world.

    AMD and Intel are both launching new chips in 2024 that have potential significant increase, in performance and energy efficiency.

    CPU
    • AMD with their 8000 series
    • Intel with their 15th Gens.

    GPU
    • AMD to launch 7000 series GPUs in early 2024
    • Nvidia to launch 5000 Series in late 2024 or early 2025

    So if you're looking to upgrade, I would recommend looking into waiting till the release of these components, or to get a discount on existing components when the new ones release.

    oh yeah! I've been gaming on my laptop but I built a desktop a while back but couldn't get a GPU. I'm buying an RX 7600 XT for that desktop. that GPU is coming out at the end of this month, I think, but I always like to wait 2-3 months to buy tech stuff after they come out. I play on 1080 so I probs don't need more than that :3

    Be careful about upgrading your GPU without upgrading the CPU. You'll have bottlenecks, and not get the performance you paid for on the GPU.
  • DepravedDepraved Member
    edited January 16
    Vyril wrote: »
    Depraved wrote: »
    Vyril wrote: »
    Just a little PSA.

    2024 is the year of potential big leaps for CPUs in the gaming world.

    AMD and Intel are both launching new chips in 2024 that have potential significant increase, in performance and energy efficiency.

    CPU
    • AMD with their 8000 series
    • Intel with their 15th Gens.

    GPU
    • AMD to launch 7000 series GPUs in early 2024
    • Nvidia to launch 5000 Series in late 2024 or early 2025

    So if you're looking to upgrade, I would recommend looking into waiting till the release of these components, or to get a discount on existing components when the new ones release.

    oh yeah! I've been gaming on my laptop but I built a desktop a while back but couldn't get a GPU. I'm buying an RX 7600 XT for that desktop. that GPU is coming out at the end of this month, I think, but I always like to wait 2-3 months to buy tech stuff after they come out. I play on 1080 so I probs don't need more than that :3

    Be careful about upgrading your GPU without upgrading the CPU. You'll have bottlenecks, and not get the performance you paid for on the GPU.

    that desktop has a ryzen 5 5th gen and one of the new boards. i built it a couple of years ago but didn't really use it as was gaming on my laptop and I couldn't really find a GPU that wasn't super overpriced. it was back then when btc got popular again xD

    anyways, right now the desktop has a 7200 gtx, which I bought just so that I could turn it on while waiting for a GPU xDDD
  • patrick68794patrick68794 Member
    edited January 16
    nothing to upgrade to for me as of now lol and that won't be changing until 2025 most likely. Latest rumors for RTX 5000 series is late 2024, only if AMD releases something competitive (and it's been heavily rumored that there are no enthusiast level GPUs for RDNA4 so that's not likely) or if 4000 series sell poorly. Since AMD likely won't be releasing high end GPUs and the 4000 series is selling fine I don't expect a 5090 to be available until the end of January next year at the earliest and it probably won't be worth upgrading to for me to begin with if the rumors are true about the raster performance increases being smaller than the 3000 -> 4000 increase was
  • NerrorNerror Member, Alpha One, Adventurer
    edited January 16
    The AMD 8000G CPUs look interesting if going for a very small form factor setup for some 1080p gaming without a dedicated GPU. Like in a mini PC/NUC. I very much doubt they'll beat the 7800X3D if paired with a dedicated GPU though, in gaming performance. The Intel 15th gen isn't coming out until well after A2 release most likely.

    So for people buying a new PC this summer for the A2 release (and possibly the spot tests before it), the best CPU options really are the AMD 7800X3D or the Intel 14 series I think. Unless a tight budget forces you into older generations like the AM4 series 5800X3D, or the newer 5600X3D or 5700X3D, which honestly is probably fine for Ashes.

    As for GPUs, I would really love to know how much Ashes will be leaning into RayTracing and if frame generation is good or bad for the game. I don't think we'll see the Nvidia 5000 series until 2025, so much later than A2 release, but depending on the prices this summer, the new nvidia Supers might be a good option. If RT and frame gen don't do much for Ashes, the AMD 7000 cards might very well give more bang for the buck.

    And lets not forget about Intel's Battlemage GPU! It's probably coming out this year and might surprise us. They've improved the drivers a lot, and it might be a worthwhile budget contender.
  • edited January 16
    I'm expecting some good advancements with RDNA 5 since they postponed it to this upcoming generation. Their new patent is something else. I will say though, the APU's are quite promising for future tech. .

    Nvidia's 30xx and 40xx series are quite disappointing in my opinion especially for the price.

    @Nerror I agree, Team Blue is going to be making some good advancements as well.
  • Undead CanuckUndead Canuck Member, Braver of Worlds, Kickstarter, Alpha One
    I figure that for Alpha 2, my current setup will be fine. Once we are a good way into the Alpha or close to launch, I will rebuild.
    Soooo, early 2026?
  • patrick68794patrick68794 Member
    edited January 17
    Nerror wrote: »
    The AMD 8000G CPUs look interesting if going for a very small form factor setup for some 1080p gaming without a dedicated GPU. Like in a mini PC/NUC. I very much doubt they'll beat the 7800X3D if paired with a dedicated GPU though, in gaming performance. The Intel 15th gen isn't coming out until well after A2 release most likely.

    So for people buying a new PC this summer for the A2 release (and possibly the spot tests before it), the best CPU options really are the AMD 7800X3D or the Intel 14 series I think. Unless a tight budget forces you into older generations like the AM4 series 5800X3D, or the newer 5600X3D or 5700X3D, which honestly is probably fine for Ashes.

    As for GPUs, I would really love to know how much Ashes will be leaning into RayTracing and if frame generation is good or bad for the game. I don't think we'll see the Nvidia 5000 series until 2025, so much later than A2 release, but depending on the prices this summer, the new nvidia Supers might be a good option. If RT and frame gen don't do much for Ashes, the AMD 7000 cards might very well give more bang for the buck.

    And lets not forget about Intel's Battlemage GPU! It's probably coming out this year and might surprise us. They've improved the drivers a lot, and it might be a worthwhile budget contender.

    Lumen by default uses a software based ray tracing solution so at the very least it will be present. There is an optional hardware based solution that's more accurate, offers a much further "fallback" range to rasterized techniques, supports more light bounces, and offers support for more "areas" of lighting (such as reflections and real time ambient occlusion for dynamic/moving objects) as well but most developers don't seem to be putting forth the effort to implement that (in fact I'm not sure any released game is using it, Lords of the Fallen might be based on the descriptions on the options for their lighting quality settings but that hasn't been confirmed as far as I'm aware).
  • sirstonsirston Member, Settler, Kickstarter
    new hard drives are on the horizon for my PC, I already "future-proofed" my PC with some tricked-out parts.
  • sirston wrote: »
    new hard drives are on the horizon for my PC, I already "future-proofed" my PC with some tricked-out parts.

    no such thing as "future" proofing when it comes to pc's. lol
  • patrick68794patrick68794 Member
    edited January 17
    sirston wrote: »
    new hard drives are on the horizon for my PC, I already "future-proofed" my PC with some tricked-out parts.

    no such thing as "future" proofing when it comes to pc's. lol

    I think that depends on what you want to do with your PC really. If all you're trying to do is play at 1080p 60fps then you absolutely can build a PC that will be overkill right now and still more than powerful enough to meet your needs in five or six years.
  • NerrorNerror Member, Alpha One, Adventurer
    720p enjoyers unite! My OC 4090 will keep me playing at 720p on my 13" OLED for the next decade or two I bet.

    On a more serious note, can we get a 7680x2160 ultrawide OLED monitor that never burns in, and a GPU that can handle it at 240Hz and 240FPS in Ashes please? Is that too much to ask? :disappointed:
  • edited January 17
    sirston wrote: »
    new hard drives are on the horizon for my PC, I already "future-proofed" my PC with some tricked-out parts.

    no such thing as "future" proofing when it comes to pc's. lol

    I think that depends on what you want to do with your PC really. If all you're trying to do is play at 1080p 60fps then you absolutely can build a PC that will be overkill right now and still more than powerful enough to meet your needs in five or six years.

    it's usually something consumers use to bargain with themselves to buy "newer" tech :wink: It's a terrible habit to have. Consumers usually buy something that is completely overkill even for the next 5 years haha.

    I usually aim to build a new computer to last for 8-10 years with overclocking in mind, replacing a graphics card every 5 years or so as that generationally is usually the standardisation for modern made games. You can usually upgrade to some better hardware near the end of life market for that generation for things such as storage and ram. Even having 32 GB of ram is still overkill lol.

    Buy what is relevant.
  • patrick68794patrick68794 Member
    edited January 17
    sirston wrote: »
    new hard drives are on the horizon for my PC, I already "future-proofed" my PC with some tricked-out parts.

    no such thing as "future" proofing when it comes to pc's. lol

    I think that depends on what you want to do with your PC really. If all you're trying to do is play at 1080p 60fps then you absolutely can build a PC that will be overkill right now and still more than powerful enough to meet your needs in five or six years.

    it's usually something consumers use to bargain with themselves to buy "newer" tech :wink: It's a terrible habit to have. Consumers usually buy something that is completely overkill even for the next 5 years haha.

    I usually aim to build a new computer to last for 8-10 years with overclocking in mind, replacing a graphics card every 5 years or so as that generationally is usually the standardisation for modern made games. You can usually upgrade to some better hardware near the end of life market for that generation for things such as storage and ram. Even having 32 GB of ram is still overkill lol.

    Buy what is relevant.

    32GB of RAM is most definitely not overkill anymore, there are multiple games that can use nearly that much memory by themselves now. Anno 1800 in late game can use up nearly 30GB by itself, so 32GB isn't even actually enough after taking into account memory used by Windows and other processes. So if you're a huge city builder fan and want to be able to play that game without issue then you will want at least 32GB of RAM, probably 64GB. Hogwarts Legacy can also use over 20GB of memory at times so 16GB isn't enough to run that game at max settings. So if someone wants to be able to do that then 32GB isn't overkill. MS Flight Sim is the same, I've seen it use over 24GB of memory.

    Again, it's all about what you're wanting your PC to do. For some people high end hardware now is most definitely overkill but they buy it because they know it will last a long time for what they want and then they'll do it all over again in several years, and there's really nothing wrong with that. For others it's the only option to accomplish what they want and they'll be upgrading as soon as something newer is out, and there's really nothing wrong with that either. Ultimately what is "relevant" is subjective and everyone will have their own opinions about what that is.
  • think of it this way.

    - PCIE 5.0 is becoming a standardisation, that's relevant for the next decade.
    - DDR5 is becoming a standardisation, that's relevant for the next decade.
    - 32 GB of RAM is a lot still, could always upgrade through halfway of generation if need be.
    - Sata is essentially disappearing making m.2/pcie nvme storage relevant for the next decade.
    - Graphics card generations change every 2-3 years minimum so replace it every 5-6 years to be relevant for modern games.
    - Super sampling and frame generation are interesting but completely not necessary.
    - 4k gaming is still in its early years in terms of optimisation. Going to be like 5+ years before 30-50% of the pc gamer market uses it regularly over 1440p.
  • Song_WardenSong_Warden Member, Alpha One, Adventurer
    edited January 18
    I'm expecting some good advancements with RDNA 5 since they postponed it to this upcoming generation. Their new patent is something else. I will say though, the APU's are quite promising for future tech. .

    Nvidia's 30xx and 40xx series are quite disappointing in my opinion especially for the price.

    @Nerror I agree, Team Blue is going to be making some good advancements as well.

    What new patent?

    Do you refer to GPU Chiplets?
    2a3b8ichz0pd.gif
  • I'm expecting some good advancements with RDNA 5 since they postponed it to this upcoming generation. Their new patent is something else. I will say though, the APU's are quite promising for future tech. .

    Nvidia's 30xx and 40xx series are quite disappointing in my opinion especially for the price.

    @Nerror I agree, Team Blue is going to be making some good advancements as well.

    What new patent?

    Do you refer to GPU Chiplets?

    multi GCD for RDNA5
  • edited January 18
    sirston wrote: »
    new hard drives are on the horizon for my PC, I already "future-proofed" my PC with some tricked-out parts.

    no such thing as "future" proofing when it comes to pc's. lol

    I think that depends on what you want to do with your PC really. If all you're trying to do is play at 1080p 60fps then you absolutely can build a PC that will be overkill right now and still more than powerful enough to meet your needs in five or six years.

    it's usually something consumers use to bargain with themselves to buy "newer" tech :wink: It's a terrible habit to have. Consumers usually buy something that is completely overkill even for the next 5 years haha.

    I usually aim to build a new computer to last for 8-10 years with overclocking in mind, replacing a graphics card every 5 years or so as that generationally is usually the standardisation for modern made games. You can usually upgrade to some better hardware near the end of life market for that generation for things such as storage and ram. Even having 32 GB of ram is still overkill lol.

    Buy what is relevant.

    32GB of RAM is most definitely not overkill anymore, there are multiple games that can use nearly that much memory by themselves now. Anno 1800 in late game can use up nearly 30GB by itself, so 32GB isn't even actually enough after taking into account memory used by Windows and other processes. So if you're a huge city builder fan and want to be able to play that game without issue then you will want at least 32GB of RAM, probably 64GB. Hogwarts Legacy can also use over 20GB of memory at times so 16GB isn't enough to run that game at max settings. So if someone wants to be able to do that then 32GB isn't overkill. MS Flight Sim is the same, I've seen it use over 24GB of memory.

    Again, it's all about what you're wanting your PC to do. For some people high end hardware now is most definitely overkill but they buy it because they know it will last a long time for what they want and then they'll do it all over again in several years, and there's really nothing wrong with that. For others it's the only option to accomplish what they want and they'll be upgrading as soon as something newer is out, and there's really nothing wrong with that either. Ultimately what is "relevant" is subjective and everyone will have their own opinions about what that is.

    Yes, everything is subjective but the OP is referring to those generations related to alpha 2 for this game. A gaming pc, workstation pc and hybrid of those two are three different scenario's. No point in debating that regardless of how marginally minimal the differences can be. Yes, ddr4 at 32 GB of ram is still more than most will need outside of the VRAM inadequacies GPU's companies scam you with (especially nvidia). I shouldn't need to explain the generational DDR differences to you :wink:. Most CPU's are overkill for the average gamer too, rarely optimising the full capabilities of cores vs threads before we get into GPU synergy. 32 GB of ram is more than enough for many.

    The higher the resolution you play at, the more VRAM you will use before other variables are accountable for performance and graphical settings. Consumers have gotten ridiculous with putting settings on max, especially with resolution "performance" for the luxury tier which has become quite comical to witness.
  • Having recently upgraded. I think I am good for a long while. If people are running a 1000 or 2000 series graphics card from nvidia then they are due for an upgrade. if they still running i5.... again needs some upgrades. Good thing is the market is starting to stabilize though so they won't have to pay a fortune when they decide to pay for a new set up.
  • Vyril wrote: »
    Just a little PSA.

    2024 is the year of potential big leaps for CPUs in the gaming world.

    AMD and Intel are both launching new chips in 2024 that have potential significant increase, in performance and energy efficiency.

    CPU
    • AMD with their 8000 series
    • Intel with their 15th Gens.

    GPU
    • AMD to launch 7000 series GPUs in early 2024
    • Nvidia to launch 5000 Series in late 2024 or early 2025

    So if you're looking to upgrade, I would recommend looking into waiting till the release of these components, or to get a discount on existing components when the new ones release.

    Saving up for a new PC in 2024 before alpha two. Thanks for the info!
  • nanfoodlenanfoodle Member, Founder, Kickstarter
    I upgraded to a 4070 for A2. Also bought and 64gb of DDR4 3600 ram. Im looking forward to some solid 1440p gaming. :) happy upgrading friends. Can't wait to see you all in game.
  • If I was buying a new PC I would go for the AM5 platform. AMD has earned a lot of goodwill with the recent release of more CPUs for the over 7 years old AM4 platform. Unlike Intel where you need to get a new motherboard every 2 generations, which is normally the earliest you would upgrade anyway. AMDs move with the 5600X3D, 5700X3D and of course the 5800X3D keeping the AM4 platform alive and viable for gaming for 7+ years is well deserving of praise. I am slightly less sure about their GPUs though. There have been many problems with drivers or build quaility over the years.
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