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The February 9 Playthrough video

Watching this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VM7d8BpYix4 , a couple of things popped out at me. I know, it's a couple weeks old: I've been busy ok.
1) mob spawn timers. They are waaay too short. Groups need to consider tactics, and people need chicken ;). There is literally nothing more annoying in an MMORPG than mobs respawning too quickly. Better to err on the side of too long. People will wait if they really want the loot. I would think that Ashes of Creation should encourage tactical play, part of that is giving people time to actually come up with tactics.
2) another part of encouraging tactical play, is toning down spell effects. They are waaay too big. If mobs are going to be tuned so that you can't pull the whole room and smash them down (which is how Ashes of Creation needs to be if it's going to live up to your promises) then melée need to see their target before they press their ability. If they can't, they are very likely to pull extra mobs. The fire arrow in particular was egregious, you could basically see nothing else. At least once in the dungeon you wiped from pulling extra mobs, probably for exactly this reason. Don't change their overall design: just make the particles die quicker and make them take up less of the screen. This is also good for reducing lag. If parties are going to be eight people, there's going to be a lot happening on the screen. I've played a melée class in a tab-targeting MMO (World of Warcraft) for ten years now, this may not seem like a big thing: but it's actually a huge deal. No group likes being screwed up by something they can't control, especially their own spell effects.

Comments

  • ArchivedUserArchivedUser Guest
    edited February 2018
    This point of developement is less a proof of concept more "is this technically feasible?", and until we reach the first beta much of the involvement from everyone will be bug reports.

    Not to say that you shouldn't think critically about the game, however, if anyone should recieve an alpha key I recommend sticking primarily to bug reports and writing down what you were doing before the bug occurred (it really helps the developers).

    As for the particle effects I think it might be good to start off a bit flashy and then scale it back as they recieve feedback (this is all still an iterative process and the best feedback will be from those that experience it).

    The reduced time on spawn tables will most likey be for alpha testing as a way to consistently provide targets for various movement/rotation bugs that are going to occur.

    I know that we long time MMO players have a lot to say about the feel of the game; once we get our hands on the first beta we can truly provide insightful feedback.
  • Sussurro said:
    This point of developement is less a proof of concept more "is this technically feasible?", and until we reach the first beta much of the involvement from everyone will be bug reports.

    Not to say that you shouldn't think critically about the game, however, if anyone should recieve an alpha key I recommend sticking primarily to bug reports and writing down what you were doing before the bug occurred (it really helps the developers).

    As for the particle effects I think it might be good to start off a bit flashy and then scale it back as they recieve feedback (this is all still an iterative process and the best feedback will be from those that experience it).

    The reduced time on spawn tables will most likey be for alpha testing as a way to consistently provide targets for various movement/rotation bugs that are going to occur.

    I know that we long time MMO players have a lot to say about the feel of the game; once we get our hands on the first beta we can truly provide insightful feedback.
    Very true. However: this is written. The point was to put these thoughts down for whenever they might become useful/relevant.  I was not expecting that it would be fixed tomorrow, or even that it will be fixed before the next video (next month). If there is one thing I have learned in my years of playing games it is that if problems aren't mentioned until they are deemed relevant, they don't get fixed until it is too late. Now, maybe I am jaded from dealing with large unresponsive companies: but it still seems like the best policy to put this in writing now because of the unforgiving market that exists these days. I also have to disagree with your assessment: and must say that if Intrepid thinks as you do then they are in for a nasty shock. The plain fact is, they haven't yet gotten to the stuff that will take lots of time. The classes that they have not designed yet will require some work to feel distinctive, be balanced and be up to the level of polish that the ones currently implemented are. Can't balance classes or talk about how they feel, until the combat is basically done. That includes fixing any problems that might impair the ability of testers to play the game properly. Furthermore, they have not started on the thorny issue of itemization.  When World of Warcraft launched thirteen years ago, it was acceptable that many of the build options in the game were not viable simply because appropriate gear could not be found for them. That would be a death sentence for any game made nowadays. Yes, even the people who wax nostalgic about Vanilla World of Warcraft would spurn a new game that had that problem today. Whether they plan for it or not: itemization will take up most of the time in the beta. I feel that by pointing out more basic issues with the game now, we can make it ever so slightly more likely that the game will actually be released on time. Thus I made this post under no expectation that the issues I mentioned would be fixed soon.
    I must also reiterate what I have said before elsewhere. If the gameplay is anything less than excellent, no amount of innovation or prettiness will save the game. Intrepid did not make things easy for themselves in this department: they have chosen to try and beat the reigning monarch at it's own game. Ashes of Creation is taking the design philosophy of WoW, but running with it to a place that Blizzard would never go. However, if they are going to do this successfully they must execute that philosophy flawlessly. WoW has had thirteen years to refine that core philosophy and has made many mistakes along the way. I witnessed that journey, as did many others. Ashes of Creation does not have the time to take that journey for itself: it has to learn from WoW's mistakes before it even launches.
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