Greetings, glorious adventurers! If you're joining in our Alpha One spot testing, please follow the steps here to see all the latest test info on our forums and Discord!

If I Could Ask One Thing From The Current Community. . .

KhronusKhronus Member, Alpha One, Adventurer
I look back at the various games I have played and I see nothing but negative toxicity from the communities. People complaining without offering solutions. It's impossible to have intelligent conversations for meaningful change because people throw out common sense and resort to being a troll. Differing viewpoints will always happen but the path to move forward and enjoy the game to its fullest extent is ultimately all of our goal. So far I see greatness within the AoC community! Thank you! Please, continue being positive and building on this solid foundation.

Comments

  • Balrog21Balrog21 Member, Alpha One, Adventurer
    We do have a great community. Let's keep it that way!
  • The game hasn't even released so technically, the community is still in its infancy. We'll see what happens when this project drops.
  • Potato BasketPotato Basket Member, Braver of Worlds, Kickstarter, Alpha One
    Amen

    I'd like to hear your thoughts on my thread about visual progression
  • DamoklesDamokles Member, Alpha One, Adventurer
    giphy.gif
    roaaztC.gif
  • NoaaniNoaani Member, Intrepid Pack
    I would add to this people not engaging in a discussion.

    Sometimes, a solution can be reached when people with opposing views discuss things. When people don't, this can't happen.
  • Noaani wrote: »
    I would add to this people not engaging in a discussion.

    Sometimes, a solution can be reached when people with opposing views discuss things. When people don't, this can't happen.

    I often dont engage because I feel like nothing more needs to be said
  • NoaaniNoaani Member, Intrepid Pack
    Noaani wrote: »
    I would add to this people not engaging in a discussion.

    Sometimes, a solution can be reached when people with opposing views discuss things. When people don't, this can't happen.

    I often dont engage because I feel like nothing more needs to be said
    That's all good - it is the people that do, and the when you ask then to expand on a thought so that discussion on the topic can carry on, they just reiterate the thought rather than expanding on it.

    It's almost like a math test where these people have the answer they want to give, but can't tell you how they got there. Since the answer is different to the one someone else has come up with, until you see how each got to that answer, you can't really see who is right.

    Or, more to the point, it's like these people formed an opinion, but don't have the background knowledge to back that opinion up - so instead they just keep stomping their feet while reiterating that point that they can't back up.
  • DemidreamerDemidreamer Member, Alpha One, Adventurer
    I found myself thinking about the math teacher scenario more than a few days ago. I was one of those who didn't write down the steps and got penalized or accused of cheating. One day the teacher put a problem on the board trying to prove their point by having me make a fool of myself in front of classroom. Sadly, to her dismay, I was able to prove her wrong by getting the right answer. I always flourished in math as long as I understood how to apply the process to a real life scenario. The flourishing stopped at logarithms for me, I never fully understood the application process.

    Teachers imo shouldn't belittle kids who may be gifted at a subject just because they learn differently. People often want new ideas and new progress, but why do our teachers get to demand that students learn "their way". By learning "their way" the students are less likely to grow up and be that creative person that thinks outside of the box. Rather they have been taught to follow the path of least resistance.

    Back to the OP,

    /cheers
  • NoaaniNoaani Member, Intrepid Pack
    edited September 2020
    I found myself thinking about the math teacher scenario more than a few days ago. I was one of those who didn't write down the steps and got penalized or accused of cheating. One day the teacher put a problem on the board trying to prove their point by having me make a fool of myself in front of classroom. Sadly, to her dismay, I was able to prove her wrong by getting the right answer. I always flourished in math as long as I understood how to apply the process to a real life scenario. The flourishing stopped at logarithms for me, I never fully understood the application process.

    Teachers imo shouldn't belittle kids who may be gifted at a subject just because they learn differently. People often want new ideas and new progress, but why do our teachers get to demand that students learn "their way". By learning "their way" the students are less likely to grow up and be that creative person that thinks outside of the box. Rather they have been taught to follow the path of least resistance.

    Back to the OP,

    /cheers

    I always make the assumption that people have a reason for what they are saying. Even though more often than not they don't, I still make that assumption.

    That teacher though... if you were getting the answers wrong, you showing your working is the only real way they have of helping. That is why they want the working shown, so that if/when you get in to more complex work - which everyone inevitably makes mistakes in - you know how to show how you reached your answer. This means that who ever is teaching you at that point is able to focus on assisting you in getting it right, rather than teaching you how to show your work which is something you should have learned years earlier.

    In math, showing your work is a tool that you need to know how to do - and at the point where you learn it, is actually more important than getting the answer right. If your teacher was trying to teach you how to show your working and you were skipping that and just giving the answer, you weren't actually giving the right answer because the right answer was the working.

    I had the same situation as you when I was about 10, I was several years ahead in math, but only because I spent the entire year when I was 9 working out that the task I was being asked to do was not to answer the problem in front of me, but to display *how* I worked it out.

    I agree that teachers need a better way to convey that this is what they want (and that belittling is never good), but the idea of showing your work is a necessary tool later on, and is best learned early.
Sign In or Register to comment.