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How developers can have an impact on economy:

Hi all, I just want to put some thoughts on economy in MMOs.

The way I see it, I believe that having NPC merchants that give some specific items for gold or even trading between other materials for some specific item can be of a big importance. Why? Because devs can put a limit on how much gold something will cost. They can increase gold of specific items or decrease it in minor patch which means they will always control the price on crafting / some other items such as potions and flasks for example.

Why would that be important you might ask yourself? Because I it will increase the level of RPG in a game like this, how? Well, by having us players work for reward, which means we will have to farm for example 1hour for 1hour of PVE content, which I think is the way to go in RPG games, because it has so much to do with immersion. The best way to become immersed is by all means to play economy in MMO.

I have strong pull toward this kind of gameplay because I experienced it in vanilla WoW. Maybe because I am PvX kind of player and I enjoy both aspects of MMO, I tend to raid at night and do dungeons / PVP at day time and in between when I run out of consumables, I farm and do open world PvP. This had so much of an impact on how I perceive MMOs, I did not play like that before vanilla classic, because it was not needed. Of course you could clear all dungeons without a single consumable, but having a opportunity to buff your class by up to 40% power, it gives you some good vibes about yourself when you achieved all that work and you had some impact on gameplay because all that work, it made game much more meaningful and I would like to see that in every new MMO. It should become a norm for MMOs, I strongly believe in this.

I do not want world buffs for example, because I know how that can have an impact on how you play games, but having strong flasks/potions/elixir/rune and all stackable can be profound experience when you farm and earn your work. It can be all kinds of things, for PVP I would introduce tanky flasks/runes etc... That give flat HP buff, or even resistance % to spells (like 20% to resist all schools of spells) or something similar - defensive... For PVE I would take flasks..etc like flat power increase, make it 30% increase if you used all buffs and make it so few of them lasts through death, other like food buffs or potions last for 30min or potions can last even up to 15 sec with high power.

Maybe honing stones could be used as a blacksmith, or some injectors from engineers that can buff damage... I know it might be too much to have all these, but really, why would you not create MMO like this. Why wouldn't you create MMO where all buffs give you flat 40% power increase, in my opinion, it is boring to see low % power in these consumables, it makes no sense at all, this is why economy is so boring in many MMOs and at least I do not have any motivation to farm gold, because I know if I spent gold on these stuff it would barely give me any power, so I refuse to spend gold and my motivation to play these MMOs runs out fast..

Please keep this in consideration it can make a profound immersive experience...

Comments

  • bloodprophetbloodprophet Member, Braver of Worlds, Kickstarter, Alpha One
    Hi all, I just want to put some thoughts on economy in MMOs.

    The way I see it, I believe that having NPC merchants that give some specific items for gold or even trading between other materials for some specific item can be of a big importance. Why? Because devs can put a limit on how much gold something will cost. They can increase gold of specific items or decrease it in minor patch which means they will always control the price on crafting / some other items such as potions and flasks for example.

    Centrally controlled markets are never a good thing.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I9kdZmsgff0

    If they control the prices of potions / flasks they they should control the prices of everything. Your idea destroys crafting.
    Most people never listen. They are just waiting on you to quit making noise so they can.
  • AzheraeAzherae Member, Alpha One, Adventurer
    I was going to put a slightly more complex version of this thread's topic into ChatGPT to see if I got a similar output, but it's at capacity as it always is whenever I try to use it.

    Anyways I actually support this idea based on my study of the outcome of it in the two games I played that have fixed upper and lower bounds for prices.

    Not because I agree with both games, but because I hate the system in one and love it in the other, and I love it in the one where I don't usually have to interact with it.

    idk I'm just here because the thread has 'economy' in the title and that's the Cat-Signal around here.

    I think my opinions on this are known from the last three threads OP has made and we interacted on, but it's 'about time for a new one'.

    Someone please put the prompt 'Write me an essay on how MMORPG developers can have an impact on their game's economy through NPC price control, from the perspective of a WoW player' into ChatGPT when you can and let me know what you get. I'm interested in comparing.
    Sorry, my native language is Erlang.
    
  • NiKrNiKr Member
    One word:
    ohshit,herewegoagain Consumables.
  • maouwmaouw Member, Alpha One, Adventurer
    Azherae wrote: »
    ...

    Someone please put the prompt 'Write me an essay on how MMORPG developers can have an impact on their game's economy through NPC price control, from the perspective of a WoW player' into ChatGPT when you can and let me know what you get. I'm interested in comparing.

    The result:
    As a World of Warcraft (WoW) player, I have seen firsthand how the actions of MMORPG developers can have a significant impact on the game's economy. One of the most powerful tools at a developer's disposal is NPC price control, which refers to the ability to manipulate the prices of items sold by non-player characters (NPCs) within the game.

    In WoW, NPCs are used to sell a wide variety of items to players, including gear, consumables, and materials. These items are essential for players to progress through the game and participate in various activities, such as raiding and PvP. The prices at which these items are sold can have a major impact on the game's economy and player behavior.

    For example, if a developer were to significantly increase the price of a particular piece of gear, players may be less likely to purchase it, leading to a decrease in demand for that item. Conversely, if the price were to be lowered, demand for the item would increase, potentially leading to a shortage of the item on the in-game market.

    This type of NPC price control can also be used to influence player behavior in other ways. For example, if a developer wants to encourage players to engage in a particular activity, such as farming a specific resource, they may lower the price of items that require that resource to craft. This would make it more profitable for players to engage in that activity, leading to an increase in the supply of that resource on the market.

    In addition to influencing player behavior, NPC price control can also be used to address imbalances in the game's economy. For example, if a particular item is being sold for significantly more than its true value, a developer may choose to lower the NPC price to bring it in line with the market value. This can help to prevent the formation of gold-farming operations and other types of economic exploitation.

    In conclusion, as a WoW player, I have seen the significant impact that NPC price control can have on the game's economy. Developers have the power to influence player behavior, address imbalances in the economy, and create a more stable and fair in-game marketplace. As a player, I appreciate the efforts of game developers to maintain a healthy economy and make the game more enjoyable for all players.

    Me: Can you expand on how this has changed since Vanilla WoW?
    The use of NPC price control has evolved significantly since the release of Vanilla WoW. In the early days of the game, NPC prices were largely static and not subject to much manipulation by the developers. However, as the game has grown and evolved, the developers have gained more tools and resources to control and manipulate NPC prices, and have begun to use them more frequently to address various issues within the game.

    One of the biggest changes that has occurred since Vanilla WoW is the increased use of dynamic pricing. This refers to the ability to adjust NPC prices based on supply and demand, rather than keeping them static. This allows developers to more effectively address imbalances in the economy, such as gold-farming operations and price-fixing, and to create a more stable and fair in-game marketplace.

    Another major change since Vanilla WoW is the increased use of data analytics to inform NPC price control decisions. Developers now have access to a wealth of data on player behavior, such as the items that are most frequently purchased and the prices that players are willing to pay for different items. This allows them to make more informed decisions on NPC prices, and to more effectively influence player behavior.

    Additionally, with the release of expansions and patches, NPC vendors items have increased in numbers, now you can find vendors that sell items that are only available for a certain amount of time, or items only for special events, this allows for more flexibility in the economy and the possibility to create special items that are not easily obtainable for all players, this can lead to a more dynamic economy.

    In summary, NPC price control in WoW has changed significantly since Vanilla WoW. Developers now have more tools and resources at their disposal to control and manipulate NPC prices, and use them more frequently to address various issues within the game. With dynamic pricing, data analytics, and more options of items available, the economy of the game has become more robust and fair.

    Me: How has this impacted the player experience of immersion in the game?
    The use of NPC price control in WoW can have both positive and negative impacts on the player experience of immersion in the game.

    On the positive side, dynamic pricing and data analytics can help to create a more realistic and believable in-game economy. By adjusting NPC prices based on supply and demand, developers can create a more stable and fair marketplace, which can make the game feel more immersive and believable for players. Additionally, by using data analytics to inform NPC price decisions, developers can create a more realistic representation of a functioning economy, which can enhance the player's immersion in the game.

    On the other hand, some players might feel that the game's economy is less immersive if they feel that NPC prices are being artificially manipulated by the developers. For example, if a player feels that an NPC is selling an item for too low or too high a price, they may feel that the game's economy is not as believable as it could be. Additionally, if items are only available for a certain amount of time or for special events, players might feel that the game economy is not consistent, and that could break their immersion in the game.

    Additionally, NPC price control can also impact the player's sense of progression and accomplishment in the game. When the price of items is artificially inflated or deflated, players may feel that they are not truly earning their gear or items, but rather that they are being handed them by the developers. This can take away from the sense of accomplishment that players feel when they acquire new gear or items through their own efforts.

    In conclusion, NPC price control can have both positive and negative impacts on the player's experience of immersion in the game. While dynamic pricing and data analytics can create a more realistic and believable in-game economy, players might feel that the game's economy is less immersive if they feel that NPC prices are being artificially manipulated by the developers. Additionally, NPC price control can also impact the player's sense of progression and accomplishment in the game. Developers should be aware of these potential impacts and strive to strike a balance between realism and immersion in the game's economy.


    This is a genius idea @Azherae
    The possibilities are a little mind boggling - so much so I might be going mad from giggles.
    Bullet point summary:

    NPC price control affects the following
    • inverse relationship to supply/demand in the market
    • inverse relationship to player incentives
    This is useful for:
    • Deflating prices/etc. of individual items
    • Targetting specific economy loopholes
    • Undermining gold-farming operations
    General trend of these controls in WoW:
    • Static control changed to dynamic - adjusting to player pricing
    • Increased frequency of use to address balancing
    • Data analytics
    • Increased variety of items
    • Time-limited items for increased dynamics
    Outcomes:
    • More realistic and believable economy
    • Dynamic pricing increases fairness and stability
    • Abrasive price control from Devs can break player immersion - "makes it feel like the Devs are handing out items" - reduced sense of accomplishment
    • Time-limited items reduce player confidence in the market
    I wish I were deep and tragic
  • AzheraeAzherae Member, Alpha One, Adventurer
    edited January 27
    ChatGPT and the like are the best.

    Aggregate search engine with essay output. What a gem.

    Thanks @maouw. I'll begin work.

    EDIT: For clarity, mine 'doesn't work' for various... reasons, so had to get it from someone else, and then forgot about it.
    Sorry, my native language is Erlang.
    
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